“A Little Boy” Soap & PAX Naturon Cream Soap


“Bocchan” (A little boy’s) soap

When I opened the packet of Bocchan soap and smelled it, I was transported back to my childhood in a whiff of nostalgia. Bocchan smells like sebo de macho, an over the counter topical ointment popular in the Philippines applied to the skin to promote healing and keep wounds from scarring. I did a little research and learned that sebo de macho is made from mutton tallow (fat from sheep). Bocchan, on the other hand, is made from beef tallow and both are of the same ivory color. That said, Bocchan does not smell at all rancid. I actually love the smell of the soap – so comfortingly simple and clean. When I held the soap under running water and rubbed it on my hands, it did not create much lather, which is fine with me. Like the suds in laundry, I also think people’s need for lather is more psychological than anything.

 

It is early spring right now and the air is still quite dry. I often find that after washing my face, I have to put some moisturizing cream afterwards. After I washed my face with Bocchan, I did not feel my face tighten as it usually does with other soaps or facial washes. This is an excellent sign that my face was not stripped of its natural oils nor did it lose its elasticity. “Squeaky clean” is actually not a good thing for our face. Don’t get me wrong, my face felt clean but not in the least bit dry. That is a big difference with other soaps. The more amazing thing is after I dried my face with a towel, I did not feel the need to put on moisturizing cream. The soap is so mild and gentle that I also used it for my 18 month old daughter. Bocchan soap is also great for washing wounds and rashes as it doesn’t sting and, like the sebo de macho I grew up with, has some properties that support the healing of skin.  Verdict? I love Bocchan!

 

Pax Naturon Fragrance & additive-free cream body soap bar (green wrapping)

Pax Naturon smells similar to, but not exactly the same as Bocchan. It also has that clean and clear smell with no hint at all of any artificial colors, fragrance or additives. Pax Naturon though has a yellowish tinge to it. When I held the soap under running water and washed my hands, the soap creates a very slippery sensation that was moderately sudsy. Pax Naturon has the same mild and gentle cleansing properties as Bocchan that left my skin’s natural moisture intact. I also used it to bathe my daughter with excellent results. Pax Naturon comes in a handier size for easier use as a hand or body soap. I love using this soap and would be happy to buy it again when I have used it all up.





My husband tried both soaps to shave his legs, using a different soap on each leg. Both soaps are great for shaving but he said Bocchan is without doubt the better soap. Bocchan leaves the skin feeling soft, smooth and extra moisturized.

Sherilyn Siy
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For Sherilyn Siy, Asia is home. Born in Hong Kong, Sherilyn grew up in the Philippines, worked for a while in Xiamen, China, and now lives in Japan. She speaks English, Filipino, Chinese (or putonghua), and Hokkien, her family's local dialect. As a certified foodie, Japan is a haven. Her favorite Japanese comfort food is a steaming bowl of ramen (which she once had twice in a day!). She received her Master of Arts Degree in Applied Social Psychology from the Ateneo de Manila University in the Philippines as a recipient of the SYLFF Fellowship and is an environmental psychologist. She loves the Japanese philosophy of mottainai, and gets very excited learning about the many ways the Japanese apply this philosophy in the latest technology and in their daily lives. At heart, she is a teacher, and she believes that the best lessons are lived and taught by example. She practices yoga and finds that it helps keep her grounded, balanced and mindful. She takes to heart Steve Job's advice to "Stay hungry, stay foolish." She is mom to six month old Ruby whom she firmly believes is the cutest baby in the planet. She is also wife to Charles McJilton of Second Harvest Japan.

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